Flawless Motion News

Predicting recurrent shoulder instability

Posted by Margie Olds on

We recently published the findings from our research study that predicts who is going to have recurrent shoulder instability after a first traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. You can read more about our research paper online here https://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/bmjosem/5/1/e000447.full.pdf In essence, it shows that predictors of recurrent shoulder instability are have a bony bankart lesion, being aged between 16 and 25 year, having high levels of pain and dysfunction at baseline, having high levels of kinesiophobia at baseline, and dislocating your dominant arm. Being immobilised and wearing a sling after your first dislocation decreases your risk of recurrent shoulder

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I've hurt my AC Joint. What should I do?

Posted by Margie Olds on

The AC or acromio-clavicular joint is the joint between the clavicle (collar bone) and scapula (shoulder blade). It is commonly injured by falling and landing on the point of the shoulder, or landing on an outstretched hand. There are three ligaments which keep the clavicle attached to the scapula.These are called the acromio-clavicular ligament, the trapezoid ligament and the conoid ligament (see figure below). Together the trapezoid and conoid ligament are called the coracoclaviclular ligaments as they both originate on the coracoid process.   Injuries to the AC joint are graded according to the degree of ligament damage and the...

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Classification of shoulder instability

Posted by Margie Olds on

Shoulder instability is classified in different categories. The different types of shoulder instability are treated differently, so it is important for you to know what type of shoulder instability that you have, and what the best treatment is for your type of shoulder instability. There are three main types of classification systems that have been developed for shoulder instability. The most recent is called the FEDS system and is a useful way to classify shoulder instability. The acronym FEDS stands for Frequency, Etiology (or cause), Direction, and Severity. For more information of the FEDS classification system, check out this page...

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Shoulder Dislocation Pathology

Posted by Margie Olds on

Any movement of the humeral head out of the socket can result in damage to your shoulder joint. Younger people tend to damage the labrum, while people over the age of 40 years tend to tear a rotator cuff muscle. Some common presentations and injuries that can occur when you dislocate or sublux your shoulder are detailed here.

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Anterior, Posterior & Multi-directional shoulder instability

Posted by Margie Olds on

What is the difference between anterior, posterior and multi-directional shoulder instability? Watch the video below, as Margie explains the difference between the different types of shoulder instability, and how each Flawless Motion Shoulder brace is designed to help anterior, posterior, and multi-directional instability

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